Saturday, September 13, 2014

Bob Marshall's Chinese Wall

Last week was the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act and I had the absolute pleasure of spending it in the amazing Bob Marshall Wilderness ("The Bob") in western Montana.

The Bob encompasses over 1.5 million acres of pristine mountains, rivers, forests and meadows and all the critters, from pika to grizzly, that call it home. The entire Bob Marshall Wilderness Complex includes the Great Bear Wilderness and Scapegoat Wilderness and sits just south of Glacier National Park in western Montana.


The Bob welcomes Dixie & me...


Who was Bob Marshall? Bob was a legendary outdoorsman and wilderness activist in the 1920s and '30s who died young at age 38 in 1939. An average day of hiking in this wilderness for him was about 35 miles and he was said to have hiked 70 miles in one day. In a word, Bob was a badass.

The goal of this trip was to visit the famed Chinese Wall, a 12-mile long natural stone wall that rises an average of 1000' above the valley floor.

First glimpse of the Chinese Wall...


Sunrise with tent beneath the wall...



My partners for this trip were Andrew and Dixie and they were terrific to hike with. We backpacked an average of about 12 miles per day in our lollipop loop that took us up to the wall, along the wall, up to Larch Pass, and back through the amazing meadows along the Sun River.

This pic is from a picturesque lunch spot at a dramatic inflection point where the wall makes a left turn...


The wall, it just keeps on going and going for 12 miles. We saw many cougar, wolf & bear tracks and scat on the trail through some really dense forest just east of here...


Contemplating the meaning of life, untrammeled wilderness, suburbs, jobs and cubicles...


Here's another view of the wall from it's shoulder on Larch Pass...


But it wasn't all about The Wall. There were gorgeous meadows and prairies, too, full of grouse & deer...


But the highlight of the trip for me was when I scattered my Mom's ashes in a meadow at the base of the wall. I knew this would be an amazing place and decided that 13 years after her death it was time to send this little portion of her back to the earth.

Saturday morning I left camp early and agreed to meet up with Andrew and Dixie later down the trail. I hiked a few miles to the wall and saw it for the first time in all its monolithic glory. A side trail lead to a meadow beneath the wall where I pulled the ashes out of my backpack. As I reached into the pack a nearby raven called out and sent a shiver down my spine. Then I opened the jar and the raven called again as tears welled up in my eyes. I spread the ashes and the raven rang out 5 more times over the next minute before launching itself from the tree eastward towards the rising sun. Now the tears were flowing like the nearby Sun River and I was immensely thankful for this amazingly special moment.

1 comment:

Rick said...

Kirk,
Looks like a great trip! Here is a couple of links to the trio m son was on this summer.
http://www.bozemandailychronicle.com/outdoors/article_faf202f6-1cee-11e4-97c0-001a4bcf887a.html

http://crew1.org/

Congrats!